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Monday, August 27, 2012

Driven to Discover: Year three reflection

Driven-to-Discover-youth-participant.jpgHere on the St. Paul campus, we see the first days of the state fair in full swing and we're finding very few monarch eggs and larvae on our milkweed plants. Summer must be coming to a close and this means that many of you have wrapped up your work with research teams in the Driven to Discover project. We do know that a few teams are going to continue to meet and we hope all of you are thinking about participating in whatever way possible in the December Insect Fair. We can't wait to hear about your findings!

It's been fun to watch monarch data come into our website from D2D teams, and hear from you as you and your teams learned great things. We know that your data are valuable to people interested in monarch and bird population dynamics, and hope that the process of data collection and research were valuable to you as well!

The Driven to Discover project has evolved in great ways this year. We had a perfect combination of new and old teams, and we really appreciate the experience, dedication to supporting youth research, and excitement about monarchs and birds that you all bring to the project. While most teams had less input from our staff scientists, you did a great job running the research teams on your own. For the few groups that did have regular visits from a staff scientist, we thank you for your willingness to let us share the experience in a way that let us see the nitty-gritty details of what did and didn't work with the curriculum.

Karen Oberhauser

University of Minnesota Monarch Lab


Evaluation tips: Closing thoughts and important next steps

  • Adult leader planning and reporting forms


    Thank you so much for all your contributions to the evaluation process so far. We realize that programs like this require a little more effort for evaluation purposes and we really appreciate your cooperation. We are working on ways to make the adult leader planning and reporting form a little easier next year and would like to talk to some of the adult leaders about my ideas to get their feedback. If you would like to be contacted to offer your views, please email Kim at kim@garibaygroup.com. She will then contact you directly to discuss your experience and views with the form.

  • Parent's comments and feedback link

    Adult Leaders,

    I hope you have enjoyed your Driven to Discover program this summer. We often get random notes from parents about how the program has impacted their youth. We thought we would try being a little more proactive this year in getting feedback. We have created a short form that parents can access through a link to provide comments or stories about what their youth did within or outside the program. You can email them the link along with the text so they can provide us with any feedback about the program. Feel free to check the link out yourself before sending it. While sending the link is not mandatory, we hope that you will participate in the process. Thank you!

    The link below allows you to share anything you wish regarding the Driven to Discover program's impact on your youth or other feedback about the program. We encourage you to share your experiences or stories of how the Driven to Discover program has affected your youth's interest in studying the natural world.

    There is a checkbox at the end of the form for you to choose how confidential you wish to keep your information.

    Thank you! We appreciate your help keeping track of the larger impacts of Driven to Discover!

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/D2D-Parent-Youth-Comments


Send curriculum ideas

Several club leaders have mentioned in passing that they've found or developed curriculum ideas and/or resources. We want to see these so we can possibly add them to future editions of the curriculum! If you haven't already sent them to us, please e-mail to Andrea at astrauss@umn.edu. Thank you!

Upcoming events

  • Mark your calendar: Fall conference call


    Let's have one more conference call later this fall to check in about plans for the Insect Fair. Mark your calendar for Oct. 25 at 6 p.m. Call in details will be the same as always: Dial 424-203-8075, access code 795878#. Talk to you then!

    Read the summary of our Aug. 21 conference call here.
  • Driven to Discover Research Summit: Dec. 7 - 8, 2012

    The 2012 Discover to Discover Research Summit will overlap with our annual Ecology/Insect Fair on Dec. 8, 2012. We will have a special Driven to Discover event on Dec. 7; this will start at approximately 5:00 p.m. and will include a dinner and a program that will include activities appropriate for the ages of all of your youth. We will put teams from outside the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro-area up in a local hotel, and will cover meals starting with Friday supper and ending with Saturday lunch. We realize that travel will be complicated for teams that are coming from a long way; we would love to have a research report from your teams as a Powerpoint, movie, or written report if you can't travel. However, we can pay airfare for up to four people from each of our Ohio and Virginia teams, and will provide reimbursement for gas for our Wisconsin and outstate Minnesota teams; we do hope that you can come to this event, and perhaps explore the Twin Cities with your research teams! If it is hard to get students out of school and leaders would like to come without youth, that is fine too.

    We are looking at possible venues for the dinner and program Friday night, and hope to use a local nature center so that we can do at least some outdoor activities (we Minnesotans love our winters).

    The Fair will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. At the Fair, your team will have an opportunity to share their findings with scientists and their peers, and attend fun, science-related activities. Again, these activities will provide options for all ages.

    You will receive a lot more information about the Research Summit. For now, you should save the dates, and communicate to parents that the event is taking place on the U of M campus and a nearby nature center. We'll be asking for RSVPs soon!


Research team updates

This space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.



Monday, August 13, 2012

Wrap up resources

Driven-to-Discover-youth-pic.jpgHi everyone! In finishing up my monarch club a few weeks ago, I developed a few reflection resources you might find useful.

Doing science is like...

I cut these pages up so one illustration is on each playing card. The kids each get one card, and are instructed to explain how doing science is like the picture that's on their card. For example, one said "Doing science is like a puzzle piece because when you learn new things everything else makes sense when you see them all together."

Scavenger hunts

I had intended to use this outdoor exploration game at my first club meeting but we ran out of time. Using it as a fun reward after our paperwork at the last meeting turned out to be a really great synthesis of all we learned and a chance for the young scientists to apply their new knowledge. There is a monarch version and a bird version.

Also, don't forget to have the kids complete the "Sum It Up" pages at the very end of their Investigator's Field Journals! (I instructed the kids who finished the post-assessment early to work on the Sum It Up pages while waiting for others to complete their assessments.)

Andrea Lorek Strauss

Extension educator, Environmental science education
University of Minnesota Extension, Rochester, Minnesota


Evaluation tips

Attendance forms

After your final meeting, please remember to send attendance forms in with your post-assessments to Siri (contact info below).

Email: scot0398@umn.edu
Phone: 612-624-7999
Address: Attn: Siri Scott
Center for Youth Development
1420 Eckles Avenue, Suite 475
St. Paul, MN 55108

Upcoming events

Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call

Our next Driven to Discover Citizen Science conference call will take place on Tues., Aug. 21 at 2:00 p.m. central time. Join the call by dialing 1-424-203-8075 and entering the passcode 795878#. During this call we'll talk about preparing kids and projects for the Insect Fair. We'll also be open to any questions or ideas you are thinking about. The entire summer schedule of conference calls is listed on the last page in the "Management" section of your binders.

Research team updates

This space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.

Monday, July 30, 2012

Citizen scientists at work

Ohio-students-searching-for-milkweed.jpg.JPGGoing out to the milkweed plot with my students is like going on a treasure hunt. The search is never the same from week to week and there are other inhabitants on the milkweed plants along with the inhabitants on the marsh next to the study area. Once you find monarch eggs, when you return a week later there are small caterpillars and by the next week the caterpillars are gone from the milkweed, hidden nearby as they change from caterpillar to butterfly. Another week and you may see an adult female landing on the milkweed searching for the ideal plant where she will lay her eggs, starting a new generation.

Deb Marcinski

Adult research team member
Naturalist, North Chagrin Nature Center
Willoughby Hills, OH


Evaluation tips

Post-assessments and care packages sent!

We sent out the post-assessments as well as some treats for your youth as they fill out these delightful surveys -- please be sure to save enough time at the last meeting for this. If you did not receive either one of these, please contact Siri (scot0398@umn.edu; 612-624-7999). Enjoy, and a huge thanks to you and your youth for your help in this evaluation!

Upcoming events

Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call

Our next Driven to Discover Citizen Science conference call will take place on Tues., Aug. 7 at 6:30 p.m. central time. Join the call by dialing 1-424-203-8075 and entering the passcode 795878#. This is a place to get questions answered, share ideas, and make connections with other adult leaders. The entire summer schedule of conference calls is listed on the last page in the "Management" section of your binders.

Read the summary of our July 26 conference call here.

Research team updates

This space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.

  • Update from Michael G., youth research team member, Ohio


    Hi! It's Michael G., and I just wanted to say that I have made a video on my caterpillars I am taking care of here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMs9U7Cjs_U&feature=plcp.

    I also found out that the tubercles on a cecropia moth caterpillar are orange and red depending on when they are going to molt, red being very close to molting.

    That's all!
  • Update from Anne Stevenson, project team member, University of Minnesota

    Here is a link to an article about a butterfly class Terri Haynes led for Anoka County 4-H in Minnesota: http://abcnewspapers.com/2012/06/29/anoka-county-4-hers-explore-the-butterfly/.

    Research team members Isabelle and Katie also helped teach and work with the kids in this class of about12-15 kids! They used the monarch board game the group created last year, and shared their research displays with this group also.
  • Update from Kristina McCullough, adult research team member, The Renaissance Academy, Powhatan, Virginia

    Project Aviary (our team name) hosted a wildlife rehabilitator who brought in a variety of education birds to help us learn more about our study animals. In appreciation of that we conducted a supply and fund drive in support of their program. I thought it might be helpful to other teams to have a pre-built flyer if they wanted to do the same. (I hate reinventing the wheel!) It's attached here.
  • Update from Gerri Fitzloff, adult research team member, Stewart, Minnesota

    This last week we found some tussock moth larvae. The girls were really interested in learning all about these critters and why there were so many this year--and we had never noticed them the last two years. I think some of them may even do a project on them. We also found this toad a few weeks ago...

    tussock-moth-larvae.jpggirl-with-toad.jpg


Friday, July 13, 2012

Scientist update

small-4th-from-ilse-hot-sum.jpgAfter a strong, early start this spring, we are hearing reports of very low numbers for monarch populations throughout much of the upper midwestern US. While it's too early to be sure about the causes for this drop in numbers, one strong possibility is the extreme heat we've been having. Monarchs, and many other animals, have a hard time with extreme temperatures, and they don't have air-conditioned buildings to escape to, like we do! We know from work done in the U of M Monarch Lab by Reba Batalden that temperatures too much above 90 degrees F start causing problems, although if these temperatures don't last long, the monarchs are okay. Extreme temperatures cause mortality, slower development, and smaller caterpillars. The attached picture of a 4th instar taken by MLMP volunteer Ilse Gebhard in Michigan illustrates this - look at the ruler in the photo and compare this caterpillar to other 4th instars you've seen!

Thanks to the monarch groups for helping us understand what's going on with monarchs this summer!

Karen Oberhauser


Evaluation tips

Youth post-assessments

The questionnaires for youth to fill out during the last meeting will be mailed to you shortly. If your numbers have changed and you need more assessments, please contact Siri (scot0398@umn.edu; 612-624-7999). Remember to leave 30 - 40 minutes during your last meeting to fill these out. Also, a little treat for each youth will be included as a huge thank you for their help in this evaluation!

Nuts and bolts

  • 30-minute (or more!) inquiry

    During our conference call on July 12, a few of you had the great suggestion that it would be useful to have the blank 30-minute Inquiry in electronic format so that you could easily distribute it to your group. Here it is. If you have access to the Microsoft program Publisher, you should use the .pub file if you'd like to modify it for your purposes. Otherwise, you can use the .pdf file. Thanks for a good idea that will help other leaders!

    Mini inquiry Publisher file
    Mini inquiry PDF file
  • Bi-monthly phone calls
    Thanks to everyone who has joined one or more of our adult leader phone calls. We've learned a lot from you during these calls, and hope that they've been useful to you. So far, we've discussed these questions: "What are you doing to get your clubs started off on the right foot?", "What are you doing to train the youth on the citizen science protocols (and to ensure data quality)?", and "What experiences have helped your youth prepare for designing an investigation?" If there are topics you'd like to cover in a call, please let us know! Look for e-mails from Grant with upcoming call details.


Adult leader resource links

Tips for taking pictures of your research team

We love seeing and getting pictures of your research team in action! University of Minnesota Extension Communications put together three simple tips for taking great photographs - try these tips for powerful photographs of your monitoring, investigation and teamwork.

  1. Try striving for a candid photograph, where team members are engaged in interaction or tasks at hand. They might be seemingly unaware of the camera or perhaps glancing at it, but most importantly they're captured "in the moment," authentic -- not posed.
  2. Try to get a perspective that is "first person." The goal is for the audience to feel like they're sharing in that moment. Photos of team members/subjects are shot at eye level or from below eye level.
  3. Use natural lighting whenever possible - which is easy to do when you are in the field monitoring birds, water, and monarch larvae!


Upcoming events

Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call

Our next Driven to Discover Citizen Science conference call will take place on Thurs., July 26 at 2:00 p.m. central time. Join the call by dialing 1-424-203-8075 and entering the passcode 795878#. This is a place to get questions answered, share ideas, and make connections with other adult leaders. The entire summer schedule of conference calls is listed on the last page in the "Management" section of your binders.

Read the summary of our July 12 conference call here.

Research team updates

D2D-Club jpg.jpgThis space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.






















Dispatch from the Rochester D2D club:

The D2D monarch club in Rochester has just begun meeting. We are part of the summer camp programming at Quarry Hill Nature Center and will meet M-F mornings 9 - 11:30 a.m. for two consecutive weeks. After three meetings we have learned to identify four different kinds of milkweed and monitored for monarchs in two different locations (total findings = 2 first instars and 1 egg). We are raising about 15 monarchs in our meeting place and yesterday had the amazing fortune of observing two caterpillars as they changed from "Js" into pupae. The kids and I were amazed! How does that big caterpillar fit in that tiny pupa? How did it make the green casing? How gross/amazing is that pile of molted skin? Tomorrow we will attempt our first mini-inquiry. I think we'll invent a question we can answer by looking at data in the MLMP website since the kids were really into the data we looked at today. I also want to be sure to save time for a fun game as we've been all-business so far.

Andrea Lorek Strauss

Extension Educator


Monday, July 2, 2012

Scientist update

snapshot-of-2010-youth-participants.jpgJune 2012 brought the Monarch Biology and Conservation Meeting to Minnesota, with several Driven to Discover groups playing big roles in the conference. The meeting took place over two and a half days at the University of Minnesota's Arboretum in Chanhassen. It brought together over 160 people from all across the US and from countries throughout the world, including Australia, Canada, Mexico, and Spain. The purpose of the gathering was to bring together monarch biologists, citizen scientists, land managers, and other interested parties in an effort to share conservation strategies, new findings in monarch biology, and information about trends in monarch populations.

Throughout the meeting, participants had the opportunity to attend a wide range of workshops and monarch-related field trips. One such trip was a visit to Spring Peeper Meadow, a Monarch Larva Monitoring Project (MLMP) site that is monitored by Cindy Petersen and her Driven to Discover group from St. Hubert School. Participants on this excursion were able to see how MLMP monitoring works and explore the beautiful meadow. Laura Molenaar and her students also assisted with monitoring and brought their research to the poster session, along with Cindy's group. Annette Strom's D2D group also braved the floods from Duluth to come down and present their research from this past summer. Additionally, many scientists who gave research talks stressed the importance of the data provided by citizen science ventures, like MLMP and MonarchHealth, in providing valuable information for research.

Overall, the conference was a huge success, in large part because of the participants, volunteers, and presenters (including several other D2D participants not listed here).

Pictures of the event will be available later in the summer on the meeting website.

Kelly Nail
University of Minnesota Monarch Lab


Evaluation tips

  • Entering parent or other anecdotes about inspiring youth

    We are starting to hear wonderful stories from parents and adult leaders about how Driven to Discover has inspired youth to go beyond the program to study their organisms or take part in the world of natural science.

    We want to keep track of anything that you hear from parents or the youth themselves about how the Driven to Discover program has inspired them. This link is a way for us to organize all those wonderful stories. Simply copy and paste an email or type the information into the comment area you will find through this link:
    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/D2D-Inspired-Youth

    Thank you! We appreciate your help keeping track of the larger impacts!

  • Consents and pre-surveys
    After you have collected all of the consent forms and pre-surveys, please mail them to Siri as soon after the first meeting as possible.

    Attn: Siri Scott
    Center for Youth Development
    200 Oak Street SE, Suite 296F
    Minneapolis, MN 55455

  • Meeting planning and reporting forms
    Thanks to everyone who has already entered a meeting planning and reporting form online! As a reminder, please fill out one form for every meeting that you have. Here's a link to the form:
    www.surveymonkey.com/s/D2D-Adult-Leader-Reporting-Form

  • Questions or confused about evaluation?
    Contact Siri!
    Phone: 612-624-7999
    Email: scot0398@umn.edu


Upcoming events

Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call

Our next Driven to Discover Citizen Science conference call will be held on July 12 at 6:30 p.m. central time. Join the call by dialing 1-424-203-8075 and entering the passcode 795878#. This is a place to get questions answered, share ideas, and make connections with other adult leaders. The entire summer schedule of conference calls is listed on the last page in the "Management" section of your binders.

Read the summary of our June 26 conference call here.

Research team updates

This space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.

Monday, June 18, 2012

What is in a bird word?

Nighthawk.jpgFor this edition of the e-zine, I thought I would talk a little about some fun words that describe bird behaviors. Some of these words are on my mind, since they describe the behaviors of my own study species, the Common Nighthawk. One way to describe these birds is that they fly around eating insects on the wing at dawn and dusk. But another way for an avian biologist to say this is that Common Nighthawks are a crepuscular species with an insectivorous diet and they hawk their prey. Personally, I find that while the second description can be a bit intimidating, once you understand this new vocabulary it is also a more satisfying description to use.

So let's spend some time unpacking this new vocabulary, and hopefully you will also understand my enjoyment of cool words to describe bird behaviors. The first new word is crepuscular. This refers to the time of day that an organism is active. For other species, you can use the more commonly known terms: diurnal and nocturnal. But for organisms that are active at dawn and dusk, like Nighthawks and many species of bats, there is another, more specific term which is crepuscular.

The next term in my second description of Nighthawk behavior is insectivorous. This term is more commonly used and understood, but no less interesting. Insectivorous simply describes an organism that eats insects. What I find fascinating about this term, is how you can quickly delve into a whole new world of vocabulary regarding diet with a word like insectivorous. For example, after understanding you can discuss words like granivorous, nectivorous, frugivorous, and even piscivorous and then find species that eat seeds, nectar, fruits, and fish, respectively.

The final term that I used to describe Nighthawk behavior is hawking. This term is actually a main source of confusion when I talk to people about my study species. Hawking in this context refers to the manner in which Nighthawks catch insects; they visually seek out individual insects and then chase them down and catch them in their mouth. This behavior is what has led to the hawk in the Nighthawk name. Many other species use hawking behavior to catch their prey including many raptor species, and more specifically many species of hawks. This similarity in behavior does not imply relatedness among all hawking species, even though this is one of the most common assumptions when I tell someone that I study Nighthawks; Nighthawks are not hawks, they are not even raptors.

There are many more interesting terms than I discussed here when it comes to bird behaviors. If you get bored with behavior vocabulary, you can also take a look at the terms used to describe bird anatomy. Some of these terms are more intuitive than others, but hopefully all of them can lead to interesting discussions and greater understanding about how birds act.

Sami Nichols


Evaluation tips

  • Updated evaluation summary checklist

    Here's an updated version of the overview of the evaluation process and documents. This latest version contains links to videos that explain the consent process as well as a link to the meeting planning and reporting form.

  • Return evaluation documents to Siri
    After collecting the consents and pre-assessments at your first meeting, please send all documents to:

    Attn: Siri Scott
    Center for Youth Development
    200 Oak Street SE, Suite 296F
    Minneapolis, MN 55455


Nuts and bolts

Driven to Discover Citizen Science adult leader roster

This Driven to Discover Citizen Science adult leader roster contains contact information for all current adult leaders so that you can connect and get in touch with each other.

Adult leader resource links

Reflective activities

Building in reflection throughout your research team is an important way to build the learning experience with youth researchers. This University of Wisconsin Extension guide contains 18 different reflective activities designed for service learning projects. These can all be applied in Citizen Science by adapting the language in the reflection questions for monitoring and investigating. Let us know how these work for you!

Upcoming events

  • Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call

    The second Driven to Discover Citizen Science conference call will be held on June 26 from 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Join the call by dialing 1-424-203-8075 and entering the passcode 795878#. This is a place to get questions answered, share ideas, and make connections with other adult leaders.

    Read the summary of our June 12 conference call here.

  • Insect Fair announcement
    Mark your calendars! This year's Insect Fair will take place on Sat., Dec. 8. This is the day research teams will present their findings to their peers and be interviewed by other scientists. We are working on some sort of event/activity (open only to D2D participants) on the Friday evening before the fair, but details on that are yet to be determined. More details to follow as the date draws near.


Research team updates

This space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.

Monday, June 4, 2012

A record spring for monarchs!

Monarch.jpgSpring 2012 has been unusual for monarchs, in a good way! We weren't expecting this good news. People have measured the area occupied by monarchs overwintering in Mexico since the winter of 1993-1994, and the winter of 2011-2012 was one of the lowest on record. The average over the whole 19 years is 7 hectares (1 hectare is about 2.5 acres). Last winter (2011-2012), monarchs occupied only 2.9 hectares; only two other years have been this low. However, it appears that a few interacting weather patterns have helped the population rebound in a single generation. First, the drought that's been drying out a large part of Texas ended. This meant that there was lots of healthy milkweed for the monarchs coming up from Mexico to lay their eggs on. Second, just when the next generation of monarchs in the south were emerging, a string of warm days with southerly winds pushed them northward in larger numbers and earlier than we'd seen for many years. Also, it's possible that several bad monarch years in the south meant that there were fewer predators and parasitoids around.

Citizen scientists in both the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project and Journey North reported seeing monarchs up to three weeks earlier than usual, farther north than usual, and in huge numbers. For example, Wendy Macziewski and I visited the University of Minnesota Arboretum on May 15, and saw hundreds of monarchs flying over the grounds. Usually we haven't even seen one monarch by that date. For reports of early and large monarch sightings, check out the Journey North website and compare MLMP state graphs from many years (check out both the timing of the first monarchs, and their numbers: http://www.mlmp.org/Results/StateList.aspx).

It looks that this is shaping up to be a good year for monarchs in our part of the country. So far, we've had plenty of rain, and a warm spring meant that the milkweed was ready for the monarchs when they arrived. Your data will really help us understand how monarchs respond to such an usual spring!

Karen Oberhauser

University of Minnesota Monarch Lab


Evaluation tips

  • Reminder: Email research team meeting dates

    Please email the dates of your research team's meetings to Siri Scott as soon as possible if you haven't yet had a chance to do this. Siri can be reached at scot0398@umn.edu.

  • Bird's eye view of D2D evaluation
    We are providing this checklist of evaluation procedures and documents that you and your team members will complete this year. Please use it to help guide your evaluation activities over the summer and don't hesitate to call or respond here (See "Leave a comment" at the top of this section) if you have questions.


Nuts and bolts

  • Safety tip: Copy youth enrollment forms

    After youth and parents have completed the youth enrollment form, make a copy of each form and place them in a plastic sleeve directly in your binder so that you always have access to medical and emergency information for each youth researcher while out in the field. If you have mailed back your enrollment forms before making copies, let us know and we'll make copies and get them back to you.

  • Your contact Information: To share or not to share?
    One way to stay in contact with other Driven to Discover adult leaders is to comment here within this newsletter (see "Leave a comment" at the top of this section). We will also share a D2D 2012 Roster in the June 18 newsletter. If you prefer not to have your affiliation organization, phone number and e-mail address shared within the adult leader group, please let Grant know before June 15.


Adult leader resource links

  • Research Team Meeting Planning & Reporting Form

    Some of you asked for a digital version of this form so you can type notes directly into it before your research team meetings. After each research team meeting, you also complete the same form online to both record what was planned and what happened at each meeting. Please complete the online form within two days after the meeting so that the information can be used for the evaluation of the project.

  • Consent: Refresher video
    Need a refresher on how to explain the consent form to parents and youth? Watch this brief video before your orientation meeting!


Upcoming events

Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call

The first Driven to Discover adult leader/project team conference call will be held on June 12 from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Join the call by dialing 1-424-203-8075 and entering the passcode 795878#. Andrea will lead the call and other Driven to Discover project team members will also participate.

Research team updates

This space is FOR YOU! We will publish exciting news from your research team here. Send any stories or pictures you'd like published to Grant at bowe0182@umn.edu.

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